Text

A new exhibition of my work opens this November at Above Second Gallery in Hong Kong in conjunction with Coates and Scarry.  For my first solo exhibition in Asia, ‘Invisible Lines’ will present for the first time a series of four abstract pieces as well as the more familiar portraiture imagery and some interesting collage type pieces containing abstract elements and drawings suspended by thread, as well as 2 guitars from the collaboration with Marlow.

Cerebral detail

detail from the piece ‘Cerebral’ Ink tea whiskey graphite and paint marker on 535gsm Bockingford watercolour paper, with hand torn edges, 50 x 50cm

 

The new collection of works reflects a fascination with automatic drawing, optics and a clear love of nature and floral pattern Pieces are worked in a combination of liquids from gin and vodka, a range of herbal teas coupled with calligraphic drawing marks and hand embroidered elements.

All pieces have been created especially for this exhibition and the work continues to question what it is that connects us to nature, to each other, and our investigates our conscious and subconscious states of mind.   It is at times intensely personal yet it’s aim is to communicate a journey of discovery to the viewer.

My time in the studio is often spontaneous, I work quickly and impulsively at times trying not to allow conscious decisions to interrupt the creative process.  At other times I interpret the marks with patterned detail and try to find some sort of equilibrium.  I believe in chance, things happening for a reason and a balance. The tension between different objects, between ourselves and nature, between people, emotions and feelings; these can all be described in a drawing with simple lines. I try to achieve a balance between the figurative and the abstract.

The exhibition is accompanied by the release of 2 new limited edition prints, Refraction and Unveil. Prints will be available from Above Second Gallery from the 21st November and are limited to 33pcs per edition.

Refraction

Refraction 50 x 70cm giclee print on hahnemuhle 310gsm german etching paper

Unveil

Unveil 50 x 70cm giclee print on hahnemuhle 310gsm german etching paper

Text

Artist Carne Griffiths in his art Studio in Leyton, March 2012.

Carne Griffiths’ artwork is born from a love of drawing and the journey of creating an image on the page. Working primarily with calligraphy ink, graphite and liquids, such as tea brandy, vodka and whisky he draws and then manipulates the drawn line. After graduating from Maidstone college of art Carne served an apprenticeship and worked as a gold wire embroidery designer for 12 years, hence floral pattern, repetition and flow play a large part in his work.

Carne’s images explore both human and floral forms, figuratively and in an abstract sense. He is fascinated by the flow of line and the ‘invisible lines’ that connect us to the natural world. These may be considered lines of energy or spiritual connections between ourselves and our surroundings and his work is often an emotional response to images and situations encountered in daily life. These daily images are recorded in a dream like sense onto the page where physical boundaries are no longer important. Carne’s work takes us on a journey of escapism, often focusing on scenes of awe and wonderment, they offer a sense of abandonment to the artist and to the viewer an invitation to share and explore this inner realm.

http://www.behance.net/carnegriffiths

Text

Carne Griffiths’ artwork is born from a love of drawing and the journey of creating an image on the page. Working primarily with calligraphy ink, graphite and liquids, such as tea brandy, vodka and whisky he draws and then manipulates the drawn line. After graduating from Maidstone college of art Carne Griffiths served an apprenticeship and worked as a gold wire embroidery designer for 12 years, hence floral pattern, repetition and flow play a large part in his work. Our writer Lottie Storey interviewed Carne to find out more about him and his creative process.

 Ink and tea on paper | 64 x 83 cm | £POA

How did you begin working with drinkable liquids?
I had always worked with calligraphy ink and water.  It was a glass of brandy that led to the first splash of drinkables on the page, and, like most things I do concerning artwork, it was a chance happening rather than a planned one.  Alcohol has a curious effect on ink, taking the colour deep into the paper very quickly - it behaves very differently to water and gives permanence to some inks.

 Ink and tea on paper | 64 x 83 cm | £POA

What is it about this medium that interests you?
There are two contrasting reasons why I use non permanent inks and tea.  Drawing with calligraphy ink onto the paper gives no room for error and records the immediacy of drawing.  Underlying all of my figurative work is an exploration of automatic drawing and the involvement of the unconscious in the work. The second reason is that the line can be manipulated using layers of liquid, allowing for spontaneity and chance happenings to guide the work.

 Ink and tea on paper | 64 x 83 cm | £POA

Your portraits have a wistful quality. What emotions do you try to express in your work?
I always approach a piece of work with the intention to get as lost as I can in the process.  I feel if a piece of work is to be emotive then something has to be given to achieve that - you have to go through a range of emotions when creating a piece of work, and connect with the work on that level.  I think I have chosen a style of work that allows me to best use those emotions. From free and bold mark-making to delicate and intricate pen strokes, there is always an injection of something else along with the marks on the page.

 Ink and tea on paper | 64 x 83 cm | £POA

You’ve recently become a father. How easy is it to combine your work with your family life?
Life has certainly changed, and my recent works reflect this - the 2 things are inseparable, life and art.  Having twins certainly doesn’t leave much time to run to the studio, but I have a new laughter in my life. These things feed in to what I do. Don’t expect faeries and bunny rabbits in the next pieces though.

 Ink and tea on paper | 66 x 140 cm  | £1,4000

Has this change made you approach your work in a different way?
It’s made me think about life in a different way, yes.  I have lost count of the times that people told me how I would feel after having children but nothing really prepares you for it.  I am looking forward to seeing how this new depth of emotion transfers onto the page.

 Ink and tea on paper | 64 x 83 cm | £POA

You spent 12 years as a gold wire embroidery designer with prestigious brand, Hand & Lock. How has this influenced your current practice?
Working within a very specific field for 12 years gives you a strong visual vocabulary.  There were many things that I learned to do as an embroidery designer that now transfer into the pieces I make.  Flow of line was always important when creating floral embroidery designs and it was something that figured strongly in my artwork through college, the transition therefore was a very natural step for me.  The most exciting step was bringing these two areas of interest back together again when deciding to create artwork for myself again.

 Ink and tea on paper | 64 x 83 cm | £POA

You seem to have a thriving business on Etsy. Have you intentionally sidestepped the traditional gallery route?
Really! I like Etsy, it provides a very good platform for artists to sell affordable works, especially low price collectibles and curiosities. Its strengths are that it takes care of all paperwork and lets you concentrate on creating.  For me, Etsy is a great platform to show small editions and collectibles like postcards and small prints.

 photo (45).JPG

Do you think the internet has brought more opportunities for artists?
Absolutely - it has brought an international audience to the doorstep of anyone who wishes to share their work.  It comes at a price though, people tend not to just stumble over your work. It takes a great deal of effort for any artist to establish a following and there are plenty of pitfalls along the way!

 Ink and tea on paper | 64 x 83 cm | £POA

Has your experience working as creative director at Hand & Lock influenced the way you conduct your own business?
Absolutely, yes.  My business knowledge was practically zero before working with Hand & Lock.  My intention was to fulfill a design role within the company but I found myself becoming drawn into other areas, such as production managing, costing, and marketing.  All of these areas are transferrable skills that will help, no matter what industry you are in.  The thing I realised early on being self employed is that you are responsible for all of these roles within your own company.  The emphasis is on you to create impact with how you conduct that business and how you treat others in your industry. 

 Ink and tea on paper | 66 x 140 cm  | £POA

Can you tell me a bit about your recent collaboration with Rankin?
Yes, the Rankin collaboration came about earlier this year. I was approached by the design team from Hunger magazine who said that Rankin had seen my work and wanted to know if I would create a test piece for an editorial that was a feature in the 2nd issue of the magazine. It was a privilege to work with the material he sent through - the shoot was amazing and I was given free rein to add my own slant to the work, without limits. I’ve been an admirer of Rankin’s work since a friend of mine brought a small black and white book back from one of his exhibitions in about 1999-2000.  When I heard about Hunger I loved the showcase concept, and I’m constantly amazed by the sheer volume of work produced by the photographer between editions.  It’s good immersive stuff, and I think his support of emerging artists through the magazine is something that benefits both the artist and the publication.

 Carne Griffiths, Nectar II, Ink and tea on paper, 64 x 83cm.jpg

I love the sound of your live performance piece with Michelin Star Chef Nicola Batavia. How did that come about?
I’ve been working with West London art laboratory Debut Contemporary for nearly a year now, and they had seen a project I had recently completed with Hong Kong brand JOYCE, which utilised small metallic eggs.  Debut did what they do really well - they saw a connection between two creatives and an opportunity to put them together, network, and finally come up with a concept for a live performance.  Following a wonderful 5-course meal at one of Debut’s Art dinners, hosted at Nicola’s restaurant Casa Batavia, we got together and planned an event, which involved the creation of one of Nicola’s speciality egg dishes. Nicola refilled a hollowed-out egg shell which I then decorated as part of the performance, using a calligraphy pen to create individual floral designs on each piece. Edible art was definitely a first for me - it’s always good to try and push the boundaries of what you do.

Ink and tea on paper | 64 x 83 cm | £POA 

What other interesting projects are in the pipeline?
I’m absolutely thrilled to be showing with Coates and Scarry at Affordable Art Fair Battersea.  I’ve admired their stable of artists for a long time so I’m stoked to have the opportunity to exhibit with them there and again in the future. Other projects for 2013 include solo shows in Italy and Los Angeles, and a collaboration with an East End fabric designer, plus a few more I can’t talk about right now!  Should be a packed year though and I am really looking forward to launching the next body of work.  

http://www.coatesandscarry.com/blog/2012/10/26/carne-griffiths

Link

Art in the Moment: GE1110 Exploring Contemporary Art, Research Project #1

naomireedart:

art-in-the-moment:

http://www.carnegriffiths.com/

Carne Griffiths

image

Working primarily with calligraphy inks, graphite and liquids, such as tea, brandy and vodka Griffiths’ fascination with drawing focuses on the creation and manipulation of the drawn line. Images explore human, geometric and floral…

I love this artist. I had never heard of Carne Griffiths before but I have to say the pieces are breathtaking. Carne uses products that would not normally be used to paint such as brandy, tea, etc. What really interested me was that Carne’s work was recognized and used in Hollywood costume designs. He had an apprenticeship in gold embroidery which was used in costumes for movies such as The Last King of Scotland and The Phantom of the Opera. I wonder how he shifted in his mediums. His most recent work is portraits, focusing in creation and manipulation. 

I love his works too. I heard about this artist from my art teacher and was really interested in his style. He really has a strong style which I loved to see and gave me a strong vivid impression. He used to use various mediums but he suddenly shifted to one specific style. I’m not really sure about a reason but I would like to research more about him. 

Source: art-in-the-moment
Photo

naomireedart:

Making a political statement toward the Chinese government 

GE1110 Exploring Contemporary Art

Joo Young (Jenna) Son

# 53147908

  I found Naomi’s blog about Ai Weiwei interesting because she explained clearly how the artist uses many different mediums on his works. Instead of focusing on only one particular art form, as a contemporary artist, he also carries his camera along to take pictures for his art pieces. I was impressed by his way of expressing his thoughts and conveying messages through his art works. Especially, the picture taken by him, which expresses his anger toward the Chinese government, gave me a strong impression because, under the country where has less freedom of speech, he conveys his aggressive stand in the picture without a hesitation. I think he is a brave artist who has a strong view on a society.  

Source: naomireedart
Text

Biography of Carne Griffiths

image

Originally from Liverpool, Griffiths graduated from the Kent Institute of Art and Design in Maidstone in 1995. After completing a one-year KIAD fellowship and moving to London he served an apprenticeship at the longest-established gold wire embroidery firm in the world. Here he worked as a gold wire embroidery designer for twelve years, eventually becoming the creative director. Carne produced intricate designs for the military and the film, theatre, fashion and advertising industries. His designs were used for the uniforms in the films Valkyrie, The Last King of Scotland, and in particular his ‘Red Death Coat’ was used in The Phantom of the Opera. Carne’s elaborate floral designs for Asprey were included in their first ever catwalk collection and his work was featured on the embroidered cover of the 80th Royal Variety Performance programme in 2008.

Since establishing his own studio in 2010, Carne has exhibited in the UK at the London Original Print Fair at the Royal Academy, the London Art Fair in both 2011 and 2012, and overseas at Urban in Ibiza in 2011 and Arts After Dark, New Orleans in 2010. Carne also collaborated with the British photographer Rankin for a feature in the 2nd edition of Hunger Magazine early in 2012.

For commissions or enquiries about original artwork please contact carne@carnegriffiths.com

Photo

GE1110 Exploring Contemporary Art, Research Project #2

New piece for ‘word on the street’ showing as part of the words over Waltham Forest annual festival of storytelling art literature and expression By Carne Griffiths

Text

"Love Animals, Love Photo Taking" Photo Exhibition 

13 October 2013

Venue: 4/F, Exhibition Gallery, Hong Kong Cultural Centre

image

image

image

image

image

Text

Hong Kong Contemporary Art Awards (HKCAA)

06 October 2013

Organized by Hong Kong Museum of Art


image

image

Contemporary Art Gallery

image

WONG Kwok-choi, Kacey

Sleepwalker 2011

Video and mixed media

image

image

Chinese Antiquities Gallery

image

image

Chinese Fine Art Gallery

image

image

Text

http://www.carnegriffiths.com/

Carne Griffiths

image

Working primarily with calligraphy inks, graphite and liquids, such as tea, brandy and vodka Griffiths’ fascination with drawing focuses on the creation and manipulation of the drawn line. Images explore human, geometric and floral forms, in a combination of both literal and abstract translation and in response to images and situations encountered in daily life. Images are recorded in a dreamlike sense onto the page where physical boundaries are unimportant. His work creates a journey of escapism which focuses on scenes of awe and wonder, projecting a sense of abandonment and inviting the viewer to share and explore this inner realm.

https://www.facebook.com/CarneGriffiths/photos_stream

Photo

Title: Find Your Own Nemo (2013)

Artist: Jenna Son

Medium: acrylic

Photo Set

Jenna Son (19 Feb 1994)

Certificates

Photo

Title: The Old Street

Artist: Jenna Son

Medium: colored pencil, watercolor

Size: 38 X 50.5 (cm)

Photo

Title: Devastation

Artist: Jenna Son

Medium: watercolor, ink

Size: 39 X 53 (cm)

Photo

Title: In My World

Artist: Jenna Son

Medium: mixed media

Size: 76 X 101 (cm)